Theoretical study on the efficiency of utilization of nanoclay-CFRP composite materials in the root area of wind turbine blades

  • layth Sayyid Salman Al-Rukaibawi Department of Building and Construction Engineering, University of Technology, Baghdad, 10066, Iraq https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2409-1811
  • Miodrag J Lukic Institute of Technical Sciences of the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Knez Mihailova 35/IV, Belgrade, Serbia
Keywords: CFRP-nanoclay, Hybridisation, Joining zone, two-steps homogenization, ABAQUS

Abstract

In this study, theoretical calculations were performed to determine the most efficient utilization of nanoclays added as reinforcement for CFRP composite materials used for wind turbine blade manufacture. Four different V39 blade models were created, and numerical simulations by FEA were performed. Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymers (GFRP), whole model made of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers/nanoclay (2%) (CFRPN2), Hybrid Glass and Carbon/nanoclay (2%) (HGCN2) and Hybrid Glass and Carbon/nanoclay (5%) (HGCN5). The targeted part was the joining zone between the root and the blade. The most important finding to emerge from this study is that the modest addition of nanoclay (2%) with carbon fiber reinforced polymer leads to a significant stiffer blade, with a minimal deflection, about 70% lower than GFRP. Furthermore, the HGCN2 model is considered to be safer as it has a lower stress concentration than others (52.84 kN/m2). It can be considered that the probability of failure of the entire root area will be decreased if nanoclay-CFRP hybrid blades are used, yielding higher durability and lower overall costs. These findings contribute to decisions related to materials selection, structural, aerodynamic design and layup schedule choice.

Author Biography

layth Sayyid Salman Al-Rukaibawi, Department of Building and Construction Engineering, University of Technology, Baghdad, 10066, Iraq
I received my Bachelor of Science in Building and Construction Management with Honours in 2006. After that I moved to Newcastle Upon Tyne and began work on my Master of Science in Structural Engineering in 2014 with the purpose of combining the interests in Structural design and Finite element Analysis in the context of Advanced Composite Material for wind energy. I implemented an Analytical homogenization at the macro-scale and in each phase of the composite using ABAQUS FEA. 

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Published
2018-12-20
Section
Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications